Wednesday

Conference Season is approaching!

There are several upcoming academic conferences in Marketing and Consumer Research, and I imagine that the same holds true for many other disciplines - Summer is the Conference Season!
Conferences are a great opportunity to meet other scholars, learn about the latest research developments in your area, and present and discuss your own work. Add to that a nice location, a couple of days out of your work routine, and the chance too see old friends from all over the world. Could be great, right? But could also be a nightmare...
That's why I've compiled a list of resources to help you make the best out of the conferences in the upcoming season, or at least go through them without much damage!

Conference listings:
http://www.h-net.org/announce/ 
http://www.conferencealerts.com/
General Advice:
What to do before, during, and after a conference
Surviving your first academic conference
On presentations:
Five golden rules
The most complete guide to a successful conference presentation

Fun:
Strategies for eating well at conferences
How to hack a conference

Many of these selected sources will link to extra resources, so you'll have plenty of advice on how to prepare for conferences. For the sake of comparison (how bad it could be???) just watch the video below and make sure to enjoy your conference season!



The evolution of geocaching density



This is so cool! It illustrates the development of geoaching in Germany throughout the last decade. Each light dot is a new cache and the final density is unbelievable...Groundspeak currently displays 135.481 caches in Germany. Considering the country's small surface (357,022 sq km, slightly smaller than Montana in the U.S.), this is a paradise for intensive geocachers!


I also think the script used to create the video might have great applications on academic presentations and teaching... it would be nice to illustrate, for example, the increase in the number of competitors in a new market, participants in a community, or consumers in a given segment without recurring to the old column graphs. What do you think?